Tagged participation

Why Are Women Leaving the Workforce?

The labor force participation rate for women grew greatly between 1975 and 2000 to a point where 59.9% of women 16 and older were participating.  During the ten years that followed, the rate fell by 1.3% to 58.6% in 2010.  Not a substantial drop but in the five years that followed, the rate had dropped an additional 1.9% to 56.7% in 2015.  Why are U.S. women leaving the workforce?

One obvious reason participation rates are declining is the increasing amount of baby boomers leaving the workforce.  Their departure however does not explain the whole decline.  Many women are leaving due to an inability to balance their work life with their home life.  A 2014 poll of nonworking adults showed that 61% of women aged 25 to 54 were not working due to family responsibilities while only 37% of men provided the same answer.  For many women in the U.S., 12 weeks of maternity leave is not long enough and the rising costs of child care increase the attractiveness of quitting work life and transitioning to home life. 

While numbers continue to decline in the U.S., they continue to increase in most European countries including Japan and Canada.  One reason is that  family policies in the U.S. are not as friendly as in some European countries.  Yes, twelve weeks of maternity leave may sound lengthy but England, for example, provides maternity leave for up to one year and in many cases it is fully paid.  They also offer protection for part-time workers.  According to a study by Francine Blau and Lawrence Kuhn of Cornell, if the United States had the same policies in place for mothers provided by European countries, the labor force participation rate would have been seven percentage points higher by 2010.  Though the European policies have their pros they have their cons as well.  These policies which support working mothers also burden their economies.  Between 20 to 40 percent of jobs in the Eurozone held by women are part time and a study by Blau and Kuhn found that women in Europe were half as likely as men to be managers while in the U.S. men and women were equally likely.

Many women who wish to return to the workforce are willing provided that their family life is not too disrupted in the form of relocation, long commutes or working irregular hours.  This applies only to women with families.  Women without children, like men, are more inclined to accept these inconveniences. 

Many women are taking time off of work to raise their children but seek to return to the workforce once their children enter school.  Their primary concern is of course how hirable they are after spending significant time away from the workforce.  A woman with multiple children could conceivably be a non-working parent for seven years or more.  Studies have shown that biases are indeed exercised towards individuals who have been unemployed for lengthy periods of time.  So in this instance moms may be ultimately punished for having a family.

And yet one poll found that non-working women are not nearly as desperate to return to work as non-working men.  In many instances, their lives improve in key categories whereas a man’s lifestyle tends to suffer during periods of unemployment.

Women want to succeed and be viewed as equals to men in the workplace and yet for mothers the best way to achieve this equality is to perhaps not pursue the path of motherhood at all.  They have a choice; a career or being the world’s greatest mom, and the statistics above might suggest praise from their child is more valuable than praise from their boss.