Are You a Better Job Candidate Than You Are An Employee?

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Have you ever noticed that some people make great job candidates but lousy employees?  Maybe you’re even one of them.

These characters are sprinters, definitely not distance runners.  Over a short span of time they can come across as just the person the employer is seeking for that important job.  Think about it, all they have to do to get hired for most jobs today is pass a resume screen and endure a handful of one-on-one interviews.

If “job candidate you” has enough insight into human nature, you can intuit what the interviewer wants to hear.  You even know that mirroring how the interviewer acts and speaks creates empathy.  Listen carefully and you’ll pick up a lot of information about that person sitting across from you.

Chameleons, these job candidate shape shifters are.  But that is not to say they are necessarily dishonest.  Now admittedly today a large proportion of job seekers are ready, willing and able to cheat on their resume if they think they can get away with it and that it will help them get hired.

But the job seekers under this microscope are just doing what comes naturally to them in the job search process.  Their skills run to accurately reading people, being comfortable and intuitive in a one-on-one setting, and knowing what buttons to push to be viewed as likeable, smart and skillful.

But there is something about them that results in their performance on the job being less impressive than that wonderful first impression.  In my experience it’s not generally job competencies that are lacking, but rather other soft skills that seem to be deficient for the long haul.

We know that soft skills are important to being able to fit into a job environment.  So maybe it would make sense to pay a bit more attention to evaluating finalist’s skills through observation and assessment before getting all gaga over the “perfect candidate”.

An extra benefit of a more attentive approach is that you’ll also be more likely to find those candidates who are better employees even if they aren’t the best job candidates.

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